How to Create an Email Advertisement

By Steve Gross

If you are running any flavor of Windows®, you have all the software you need to design and send HTML e-mail advertisements. Follow the steps outlined here and by the time you've finished, you will have a good sense of how you can design your own HTML e-mail ad.

Things You'll Need

  • MS Outlook, Outlook Express or Windows Mail
  • Access to a web server

Six Steps to Success

Step 1

Find and size the graphic(s) you will use.

Step 2

Upload the graphic(s) to a directory on your file server. Make a note of the absolute web address (for example, http://YourWebSite.com/graphics/myPic.jpg). See note.

Step 3

Open a new e-mail window and design your ad. Put the graphics where you want them, fill in the copy; create text boxes, borders, whatever you want.

Step 4

When you've finished, in Outlook, save your file as an Outlook Template (File / Save As / Outlook Template); in Outlook Express or Windows Mail, just save the document and the program will put a copy in your "drafts" folder.

Step 5

Send your ad to yourself and a friend to ensure the graphic and other links you have included work the way you want them to work.

Step 6

When you have confirmed that everything works (or have fixed what doesn't work), send it out.

Tips & Warnings

  • For the graphics in your recipient's copy of your ad to load properly, his computer must know where to find them. Since It can't get them from your computer, you need to tell his computer exactly where the graphics are on the Internet. You do that by using the absolute Internet address when you "insert" the pictures.When creating HTML e-mail, remember to choose fonts that are also likely to be installed on your recipients' computers. That helps to ensure your ad displays properly. If you want your ad to display properly on different operating systems (Apple computers, for example), unless you have a graphics program capable of "outlining" (rasterizing) your type, use Courier. You need to remember that you are creating an e-mail. Keep the measure (width) narrow.