How to Put a Desktop Computer to Sleep

By Techwalla Computers Editor

By putting your desktop computer to sleep, you save power when your computer is idle. Standby and hibernation are two different kinds of sleep. These instructions are for Windows 98.

Things You'll Need

  • Computers
  • Microsoft Windows

Manually Putting Your Computer on Standby

Step 1

First, save all of your work. Information in computer memory is not saved while your computer is on standby.

Step 2

From the Start menu, select Settings, then Control Panel, then Power Management.

Step 3

Click Standby Beside When I Push the Power Button.

Step 4

Push the Power button.

Automatically Putting Your Computer on Standby

Step 1

Save all work before leaving your computer.

Step 2

From the Start menu, select Settings, then Control Panel.

Step 3

Double-click Power Management.

Step 4

Set the times that you want your system to go on standby, to shut off the monitor and to shut off the hard disks.

Step 5

Click OK. Your computer will go on standby according to the schedule you have entered.

Putting Your Computer in Hibernation

Step 1

From the Start menu, select Settings, then Control Panel.

Step 2

Double-click Power Settings.

Step 3

Click on the Advanced tab.

Step 4

At the When I Push the Power Button On My Computer screen, click Hibernate.

Step 5

Click the Power button.

Tips & Warnings

  • Not all computers have a Standby mode.
  • Alternatively, from the Start menu, click Shut Down. In the dialog box that appears, click Standby.
  • The number of Standby options that are available to you depends on the capabilities of your hardware.
  • When you put your computer in hibernation, everything that is in memory will automatically be saved. When you reopen your computer, it will open the programs and files that were open when you initiated the hibernation command.
  • If there is a power failure while your computer is on Standby, work that has not been saved will be lost.
  • Work not saved in memory will be lost in the event of a power failure.
  • Not all computers have the capability of going into hibernation. This is a function of the hardware.