How to Insert a GIF Animation Into an Email

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You can easily insert a GIF animation into the body copy of an email or as a permanent signature. Adding a GIF can spice up your daily emails, and a carefully selected GIF can express a difficult emotion without using any words. It's a low-consequence, humorous way to communicate when used appropriately. Inserting the actual GIF takes only a few seconds, but locating the perfect GIF to use requires some exploration as numerous options are available.

Sourcing a GIF

Before you can send a GIF, you need a source for the GIF. Several large GIF libraries are available, and they host the graphic while you share it through a link or snippet of code. The code is transferred to the email by a quick copy and paste of the GIF. Giphy is a leading library, and the platform is easy to use. Execute a search for a GIF using keywords and subjects related to your emotion or purpose. The site generates a list of relevant GIF options that you can insert into an email. You can also add Giphy to Slack or other messaging platforms.

Email a GIF

After you locate an appropriate GIF, insert the GIF in Outlook, Gmail or any other email platform. To do this, right-click on the GIF and select "Save." Then, navigate to the email and right-click where you want the GIF to display and click "Paste." You can also click on a specific GIF on the Giphy website to visit the GIF's specific page. On this page, you find options to copy an embed code or a link or send it directly to another person using social media channels or email. The link and the embed code both work on most email platforms. Copy and paste either where you want the GIF to appear.

Avoiding Spam Filters

Keep in mind, the GIF can trigger spam filters on the receiving email server if you are not already whitelisted by the recipient as a trusted source. You can insert a GIF in Outlook, Gmail or any other common email platform and the email will still encounter the same issue on the receiving end. Lead with a plain text email and do not send a GIF until you receive a response. After you receive the response, the recipient's email server has identified you as a trusted source. Send the GIF in any email going forward, and it should be received unless the receiving party manually flags the email as spam.

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