How to Remove Just-In-Time Debugger

By David Wayne

Microsoft Visual Studio includes a system-wide debugging feature called the Just-In-Time Debugger, which is enabled by default when you install Visual Studio. The feature helps you find bugs in your applications during normal use, but it can become a distraction, or even a barrier to your work, by preventing applications from launching when it detects a problem. You can disable JIT debugging in the Visual Studio Options menu, or if you can't or don't want to launch Visual Studio, you can disable the feature by editing the Windows Registry.

From the Visual Studio Options Menu

Step 1

Launch Visual Studio, click “Tools” and select “Options.” A pop-up dialog displays the categories of options in the sidebar and the option properties in the main window. You must have administrator privileges to change the Just-In-Time Debugger settings, as this system-wide feature alters the Windows Registry settings.

Step 2

Expand the “Debugging” category by clicking its arrow in the sidebar. Select “Just-In-Time” from the Debugging category.

Step 3

Deselect the types of code you no longer want JIT debugging to evaluate. The options are Managed, Native and Script. Managed code refers to Javascript, Java, Python and other languages whose interpreters automatically manage memory allocation and garbage collection. Native code refers to languages such as C and C++ whose compilers generate native machine code without automatic memory management. Deselect all the options to completely disable the Just-In-Time Debugger.

Step 4

Save your changes by clicking “OK.”

From the Windows Registry Editor

Step 1

Press “Windows-X” and select “Run.” Type “regedit” (without quotes) in the Run dialog and press “Enter.” The Windows Registry Editor opens.

Step 2

Navigate to the appropriate folders in the tree browser. Depending on your computer's architecture, the Just-In-Time Debugger registry keys are located on two possible paths. For both 32-bit and 64-bit systems, expand the “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE” and “SOFTWARE” directories.

Step 3

Expand the “Wow6432Node” directory for 64-bit systems only. For both 32-bit and 64-bit systems, expand the “Microsoft” directory, then find and delete the following two registry keys:Windows NT\CurrentVersion\AeDebug\Debugger.NETFramework\DbgManagedDebugger

Step 4

Quit the Registry Editor and restart Windows.

Tips & Warnings

  • Information in this article applies to Windows 8.1 and Microsoft Visual Studio 2013. It may vary slightly or significantly with other versions.