Panasonic Lumix Camera Instructions

By Ann Mapleridge

The Pansonic Lumix line of digital cameras includes a variety of different cameras for everyone from the entry-level consumer to the professional photographer. While each Lumix model camera is a little different, there are a few similarities throughout the line in how the Lumix cameras operate. If you've recently purchased a Lumix camera getting started using the camera should only take a few minutes.

Taking Pictures

All Panasonic Lumix cameras have a power button on top of the camera for turning the camera on as well as a shutter button for taking pictures. The camera will default to being in a full automatic mode, meaning you can instantly take it out of the box, press the shutter button, and take a reasonably decent picture. To use the auto focus on your Lumix camera press the shutter button down halfway. Once your subject is in focus depress the shutter button down the remainder of the way in order to capture your shot.


The flash on the Pansonic Lumix cameras can either be turned on, turned off, or set to automatically turn on in dark situations where the camera thinks it needs more light. Press the button on the back of the camera designated by a lightening bolt with an arrow at the end to adjust the flash. Once you press the flash button you will be given on-screen options (on the camera's LCD screen) of turning the flash on, turning the flash off (designated by the lightening bolt with a cross through it), or putting the flash in automatic mode (designated by the word AUTO beside the flash icon).


The ISO setting in your Lumix camera determines how sensitive the camera's sensor is to light. Typically you will want to use a low ISO in bright situations to make the camera less sensitive and a high ISO in dark situations to make the camera more sensitive. Your camera defaults to automatically selecting an ISO for you. If you would like to adjust your own ISO press the button on the back of the camera labeled "ISO" and scroll through the available options. When setting your own ISO it is always good to take a few "test shots" to make sure your setting is what you want before taking an important shot.

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