How to File a Complaint Against Comcast

By James McElroy

Comcast Corporation, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the nation's largest cable provider, serving 39 states. It also provides digital telephone and Internet service, and owns cable networks, including the Golf Channel. If you have an issue with Comcast and are unable to resolve it with Comcast itself, you have other methods of recourse. File a complaint with an outside organization to resolve your issue with Comcast.

Step 1

File a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission, which regulates communications service providers. Navigate to the FCC website; then scroll down the page and click on "Filing Complaints" under "Consumer Center" on the left side of the page. Select a reason for your complaint, such as broadband service or cable TV issues, and click next. The website will ask you to select a more specific reason for your complaint before it directs you to an online complaint form, which will ask for your personal information and specific details of your complaint. Complete the form and click "Submit Form" at the bottom of the page.

Step 2

Navigate to the website for the Better Business Bureau, which will attempt to negotiate a resolution to your complaint with Comcast. Select "File a Complaint" from the home screen. Note that the Bureau specializes in complaints that deal with advertising and customer service. Select the nature of your complaint and your location; then identify Comcast as the company and the site will give you the contact information for your local Bureau office before it redirects you to the complaint form. Fill out your personal information and explain the nature of your complaint. An agent at the Bureau will then review your complaint and send it to Comcast. Write down your complaint number so you can check back on the website to review your complaint's status.

Step 3

Contact your local cable regulator. Some states and local communities regulate cable providers on a local level to the extent that their regulations do not interfere with FCC policy. Depending on where you live, your local regulator could be an agency of the state government, a city council commission or a board of supervisors. The FCC refers to these entities as "local franchise authorities." Perform an Internet search for your local cable-franchise authority and find out the best way to contact it to file your complaint, which could be by attending a committee meeting, sending a letter or making a phone call.