How to Set Up a Bushnell Telescope

By Contributing Writer

Bushnell is one of the world's leading manufacturers of optical products and that includes telescopes, which have been astronomy buffs' tool of choice when looking at the heavens since the 17th century. However, telescopes have come a long way from sticking the scope on a tripod and pointing up.

Step 1

Know which telescope you have. Bushnell makes 14 different models of telescope under four major lines -- Northstar, Discoverer, Harbor Master and Voyager. Each takes a little bit different set up, but follow the same general ideas.

Step 2

Make sure all off of your parts are included. Bushnell puts a parts list in each of their shipments that allows the users to check off what they have. Customer service numbers are on that packing list in case something is missing or broken.

Step 3

Put the pieces together. Bushnell telescopes are easy to build. Simply take the scope out of the package and attach it to the tripod. Make sure, though, to check for any damage to the system. In addition, the user may have to attach the viewer, but that is not hard to do. Simply screw the piece on to the scope with one's hands.

Step 4

Find the computer. The Northstar and Discoverer lines come with built-in computer systems with pre-set coordinates for planets, constellations and faraway stars. Simply turn it on, and the system should start working. However, some of the Northstar lines have a remote computer that requires batteries. Both systems are easy to operate.

Step 5

Go old-school and simply point upward. The Harbor Master line doesn't have any computers. The Harbor Master is a replica of a 19th century scope, but with a very modern viewing system. Just find a clear spot to look from and start gazing. However, all of the telescopes can be set up manually by extending the tripod down and pointing the lens upward.

Tips & Warnings

  • Always check your mount to make sure your telescope will not tip over.
  • The computer's batteries do burn quickly, so don't leave the telescope on when not in use for long periods.
  • Seeing all black? Take the lens cover off.

References & Resources