How to Find a Telephone Number From an Address

If you have someone's address and realize that you don't have their phone number, you can often do some internet research to find an associated phone number.
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If you have someone's address and realize that you don't have their phone number, you can often do some internet research to find an associated phone number. This is especially likely for people who still have landline phones listed in a traditional directory. Depending on the circumstances, you can also look up property ownership data online in many communities, which may help you contact the person associated with an address.

Have Address, Need Phone Number

Traditionally, when landline phones were more commonplace, people would be listed in a White Pages residential phone book with their names, addresses and phone numbers indicated. While ordinary phone books let you search for a person by name, you could also use reverse phone directories that enabled you to search for an address or a phone number and find the other information for a person.

These print directories still exist to a limited extent, and you may be able to find them at your local public library, but you can also use equivalent online tools to do a reverse address lookup for a phone number. So-called people search engines like ZabaSearch and Whitepages will let you type in an address or a phone number to find who is associated with it and other related information.

Try using multiple people search engines if one doesn't have the information you need when you have an address and need a phone number, since each has its own database. You may have better luck finding information about landlines associated with an address than a cellphone number, but cellular numbers are often available as well.

Use an Ordinary Search Engine

You can also use an ordinary search engine such as Google or Bing to find information about an address. Simply type the address, including the city and state, into the search engine and see if any listings mention who lives there, works there or owns the property. You may also see listings for businesses registered at that address.

Even if you only see names, not phone numbers, you can take these names to people search engines and see if any are associated with a phone number. You may also find other useful contact information such as email addresses that you can use to contact people associated with the property.

Searching Property Records Online

In the United States, it's generally a matter of public record who owns which properties. Traditionally, this information was recorded in paper records, but many jurisdictions have begun to make the information available online as well.

Determine what government agency maintains property ownership information in your jurisdiction. It's usually stored at the city, town or county level. Then, see if this agency has an online search portal where you can type in an address and see who owns it or access documents such as deeds that will specify the property owner.

Even if the information online doesn't include phone numbers, it may provide you with valuable information that you can use to reach the property owner. For instance, if there is a name of an individual owner, you can look this person up on social media, in ordinary search engines and in people search engines.

If the owner is a corporation, you can use your state's online corporate information database to find out who owns the company or look for a company website with contact information.

Dealing with Emergencies

If you notice some sort of emergency or unusual situation at a particular address, you may not want to wade through search results and property records yourself to figure out who to contact. If it's a life-and-death emergency, call 911 or another appropriate emergency number in your jurisdiction.

If you see a potentially unsafe condition, such as a water leak or a downed power line, consider contacting the appropriate utility company. If you see what looks like evidence of a crime being committed, reach out to the police.

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